“On the morning of the accident, Carly had forgotten to set the alarm and overslept.”

It’s only been a month since I last read Peter James, which makes a change from seemingly having a year or so between each outing. There may be a couple of spoiler-y points below as this is the seventh in the series, so if you’re really interested in protecting your narrative interests, go back and read up to this point. If you’re not fussed, then please, continue!

One rainy morning in Brighton, Tony Revere is killed on his bike in a road traffic collision. The vehicles involved are a car with a drunk driver, an articulated lorry with a driver who is overtired, and a white van that lost its wing mirror and quickly fled from the scene. The tragic event is made worse, however, when it turns out that Tony Revere is the grandson of New York’s current Mafia “Godfather”, and his family have some powerful connections.

Upon learning about the death of their son, the Revere’s set about plotting revenge. DS Roy Grace and his team are trying to find the driver of the white van, but when they do find him, it’s too late, he’s already dead. Not long later, the body of the lorry driver is found too, brutally murdered in a very inventive manner. Carly Chase, the surviving driver of the collision, is told that she should go into hiding and may even have to change her name and start a new life to avoid being killed, as someone has clearly got it in for anyone involved in the death of Tony Revere. But Carly is determined that she will not be scared underground, a decision she may come to regret as a mother’s worst fears begin to be realised…

Once again, Peter James makes use of his astounding attention to detail, bringing every single location, character and plot point to a fully three-dimensional state. While the main characters of Roy Grace, Cleo Morey and Glenn Branson are all excellent and hugely developed, there aren’t any characters, really, who simply fade into the background. Almost all characters have a name and are introduced with an appearance description and some nugget of information or two about them, even if we only see them for one chapter. The exposition never feels heavy-handed though, just incredibly immersive.

I am becoming increasingly fond of the characters Norman Potting and Kevin Spinella. Neither of them are pleasant people – Norman is on his fourth marriage and still has old-fashioned views on sex and race, and Kevin is every inch the kind of journalist that gives the rest a bad name – but they still manage to be somewhat sympathetic. Norman, for example, seems to be experiencing the breakdown of his latest marriage, and despite his views, remains an excellent copper and seems to be very lonely, spending more time at work than necessary so that he can feel wanted. Kevin is nasty, but here you can’t help feel a little sorry for him when Roy lashes out at him; it is his job to sell newspapers, of course. ACC Rigg, Roy’s boss, is also a great addition to the series.

James’s level of detail is not limited only to descriptions, but also he’s very aware of the history of these characters. Throughout, references are made of the cases in the previous books. A lesser writer would have them forgotten about, but here some of them are just starting to go through the courts. There’s also a really smart insertion of a character from the previous novel who got away with his crimes and is still living unmolested in Brighton. His name isn’t given, but it’s quite obvious who it is. Little touches like this are smart, and bring home the fact that all these stories are taking place in the same city, so there are bound to be some overlaps. We also get to learn a little more about Roy’s missing ex-wife Sandy, and James knows how to end on a cliffhanger, for sure.

The story does take a little while to get going, I felt, but once the killings start, things are impressively gory and the methods of execution are unlike anything I’ve ever seen before. I’d worry about what goes on in James’s head, if it wasn’t for the fact I don’t want them to stop. The fact that the minutia of the novel is so realistic means that when the more bizarre incidents occur, you completely buy them, no matter how scary or shocking.

Seven books down, and the thirteenth has just been released. I’d better get a move on.

If you like tales of macabre murders, may I be so bold as to suggest my novel, The Atomic Blood-stained Bus, which gives murder a slightly more magical twist.

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