wolp“Making one’s home in an unpublished novel wasn’t without its compensations.”

As I continue on with my reading of Jasper Fforde’s work, we come to the third installment of the Thursday Next series. As explained last time, continuity once again hits hard so there will be spoilers from the off. There are also spoilers for another of his books within, but we’ll deal with that further down the page. So, for now, settle in and let’s discuss the third book.

Thursday Next has decided that she needs a break. After all, being hunted down by a sinister corporation that controls everything, making an enemy of one of the UK’s most powerful politicians, and finding yourself pregnant by your husband who doesn’t exist is enough to make anyone a bit stressed. She takes up residence inside fiction. Quite literally, she moves into an unpublished (and terrible) novel called Caversham Heights, with the stipulations that she must take on the role of Mary Jones and play her part, as well as continue working for Jurisfiction, the organisation that polices books from the inside.

But it’s not exactly going to be restful. Down here there are issues with an escaped Minotaur and a horrible accident with a mispeling vyrus, two Generics who are struggling to develop personalities before assignment, an apparent plot to kill prominent members of Jurisfiction, and the 923rd Annual BookWorld Awards to attend. And every day the memories of her husband become fainter and fainter…

As usual, there’s a lot more to this plot, but I don’t want to overload it. More than others, it sometimes feels like a string of funny scenes that Jasper Fforde has thought up and wants to get in, but I’m not complaining. The plot runs along and never gets lost in the madness, and the madness all works so beautifully that more than anything I’m simply angry that I didn’t get there first. This book is the first to spend the majority of the time inside fiction instead of the real world (the Outland) and so we get to explore in more depth some of the earlier concepts. These include the use of footnotes by characters to communicate with one another, finally showing them at their most wonderful in the climax of the novel, an explanation of how spelling errors get into books, and how some people are employed full time to fix plot holes, as well as introducing us to the way that characters are born and get their roles.

While some characters appear and are fictional within this world too, others are known to us. We get to spend a lot of time inside Wuthering Heights and Shadow the Sheepdog, both to hilarious effect. We’re introduced to heroes of literature such as Mr Toad, Miss Tiggy-winkle, Quasimodo, Captain Nemo, and a whole host of nursery rhyme characters. The latter group here are currently campaigning for more rights, as it’s tough being a character from the Oral Tradition with no set book to call home. If only they could be granted a novel where they could life in safety and find literary success… Frankly, this is the most bonkers and wonderful subplot in the entire series. No, actually, second. The first is still two or three books away.

As usual, I have very little bad to say about Fforde. It’s slick, hilarious, fiercely intelligent and a real love letter to literature. Here we learn that books are constructed within the Well of Lost Plots, the words being beamed directly to the author’s pen or keyboard once the words have been dredged up from the LiteraSea. I can’t fault this series, it’s so wonderful and it’s impossible not to laugh, or feel a little tug on the heartstrings when you catch a mention of a book or character that you love.

If you love books and still haven’t got round to this series, for goodness sake why?

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