carry1“So Carmen was married, just.”

Literature, like life, runs the gamut of the happy to the depressing, and that is what makes it so wonderful. And just because a book makes you sad, that is not a reason to be sad yourself. In fact, if a book succeeds in making you sad, then it is a very good book. After all, you’re just reading slices of tree with inky squiggles on them. Not all books can be laugh-a-minute comedies or set in esoteric and strange fantasy worlds – some of them have to tug at the heartstrings.

Carry The One (which is a wonderfully evocative title) begins at the wedding of Carmen and Matt and, while this should be a day of happiness, it ends on a note of tragedy. Leaving the venue late that night, a car of five guests, all sleepy, stoned or drunk, sets off with just its fog lights on and, somewhere down the track, hits a small girl who is catapulted over the car and declared dead almost immediately.

The rest of the novel follows the car’s passengers for the next two and a half decades and how this event follows their every waking minute. In the car are aspiring artist Alice, her brother Nick who is stoned and wearing a wedding dress, his new girlfriend Olivia – the fated driver of the car – wedding singer Tom and the groom’s sister Maude, who has just slept with Alice and seems keen on continuing the habit. Alice and Nick’s other sister Carmen, she who just got married, also feels guilt for allowing them to drive off without their lights on. From the moment the young girl, Casey Redman, hits the front of the car, their lives are inexplicably changed and wherever life leads them from this moment on, they are part of an exclusive club that is burdened with grief and, wherever life takes any of them, they always have to carry the one.

While the characters are not always entirely sympathetic, they are nonetheless interesting and their lives don’t seem extreme, and neither do any of their reactions to the death. Twenty-five years is a long time to cover, and the characters spread from 1984 to 2009 (approximately, given signals from other events that occur in the world while their lives unfold), given us a full insight into the way their futures pan out. While there are some touching, tender moments of happiness, they have to deal with issues such as divorce, drug addiction, affairs, prison, politics and fame, all of which are shown in a gritty, unpleasant manner.

Perhaps they all feel they have been cursed somewhat by the events of that fateful night. Alice’s best work are paintings of the girl they killed, as she may have been if she’d lived, but she cannot bring herself to ever show them to anyone. Nick spirals down into a mess of drink and drugs, supposedly unable to forgive himself for that night. They all blame themselves, with the exception of the singer Tom, who has turned the event into a song and is making money off the tragedy, something the others cannot forgive him for.

Secondary characters are also constructed with more than one direction, such as Carmen’s son Gabe, and the parents of the three siblings. It put me in mind a little of a book I read a couple of years back called Breaking Away, which was also about the relationships between siblings. More than anything, it is a story that deals with their relationships with one another. I find I never see enough books that have this as a focal point or central theme of the story, when sibling relationships are perhaps among the most interesting and complicated of any that exist.

It’s a very moving book. Not exactly gripping, but your interest would be hard pushed to wane and the ending is delicately handled and rather beautiful. Above all, it’s a novel about grief and guilt, two feelings that I think every human on the planet has considerable experience of, and perhaps that is what makes it so relatable.

Need something a little more unrelatable? Try my debut novel The Atomic Blood-stained Bus, which is about gods, witches and immortality. And stick around too, as I’m about to embark on a certain classic sci-fi writer for the first time for my next review.

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